The Alice Light Bulb Moment

Yesterday, I posted an entry on the Blue Door in which I said that I was too busy to blog about some things, and one of the things I was too busy to blog about was the fact that in every single class I ran on Thursday, I was able to pull off  what I call “Helen Keller” or “light bulb” moments; that glorious few seconds when a kid leaps from “I don’t get it” to “OH!  NOW I see!!”  I live for these moments, and the fact that I was able to execute the same one in all three of my core English classes was kind of a record for me.  I needed to share.

The entirety of CHS is reading Alice in Wonderland.  Several of the kids have read it before (and a number of them are familiar with bits of the story through various film interpretations), but none of them has analyzed it yet; they’ve read it for the surface stuff, but really haven’t taken the time to really think about all the weird shit that happens in the novel.  I had suspected that the kids were blowing through the book without really getting what they were reading, and I suspected that they were missing some of the funny stuff, so I decided to point something out to them to see if I was correct.

At the very outset of the story, Alice impulsively follows a waistcoated white rabbit down his hole and finds herself falling for what feels like forever; she has time to observe the walls around her and to investigate an empty jar of orange marmalade, and then she starts thinking about how she’s going to apply this experience to her life when she returns to it (though she doesn’t really give a thought as to how she’s going to get out of her predicament; her impulsivity is something which serves as a constant through the novel).  She thinks to herself:

“After such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down-stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!” (which was very likely true.)

I read that passage aloud and asked the kids to really think about what was being said here, both by Alice and by our narrator (who, it turns out, has a flair for snark).  They read it, and read it again, and really didn’t see anything much to it.   Just when they started thinking that I was seeing something that wasn’t really there (“because English teachers do that all the time, you know; they try to find something deep and meaningful in everything!”), one girl gasped and her eyes got HUGE and I pointed at her and said “SHHHHH!  Let them work it out for a little longer!”

Of course, this got them all riled up; they HATE it when one of them is in on a joke that they don’t get, so they went back to the passage and tried to will themselves to figure it out.  One by one, a few more kids got the joke, and when about five of them were bouncing in their seats wanting to explain it to all the other kids, I pointed back to the first girl and said “GO!”

“YOU GUYS!” she said, “The narrator is telling us that she wouldn’t say anything if she fell off the top of the house because she’d be, like, DEAD!  She LITERALLY wouldn’t say anything about it because she’s be a smear on the sidewalk!”

Yes, my lovely; that’s it exactly.

That scene played out, in almost exactly that way, in all three of my classes.  It was awesome.  My hope is that this little exercise will inspire my babies to read more carefully, and with an eye toward the snarky and ironic.  We shall see if my hope is well-founded.

I love my job.

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5 Comments

Filed under analysis, book geek, fun, funniness, great writing, Helen Keller Moment, I can't make this shit up..., I love my job, Literature, little bits of nothingness, reading, success!, Teaching, the good ones

5 responses to “The Alice Light Bulb Moment

  1. Pingback: Directing Traffic « The Blue Door

  2. For a bonus question on my Geometry test on Transformations, I have the students “decode” a passage from “Jabberwocky”. It’s always a hoot for me to see their puzzled looks as they try to figure out if they have a correct answer when they come up with “‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimbel in the wabe.”

    Good times.

  3. UGH. Seriously; I’ve done SO much work trying to convince the kids that Carroll was neither a drug addict nor a pedophile:

    “But Mrs. Chili, he liked to hang with little girls and he wrote some MESSED UP stuff!”

    “Yes, Babies, but that’s because he was a brilliant mathematician with poor social skills. Being a shy genius does not necessarily make one a drug-addled pervert.”

    Sigh.

  4. Um, yeah, I didn’t get it at all. I thought he was saying it was “very likely true” that she would fall of the top of the house. Maybe I’m in the wrong profession… :-P

  5. chili,

    Hope this finds you well. “The Mandolin Case” is going great; even got the typos out of the second edition!

    I have a school gig tomorrow. Any suggestions from you or your teacher friends would be appreciated. I’m just getting started with this part of my journey and have no idea what I’m doing.

    Someday when I come up North I hope to get to get to talk to your kids too.

    All the best,

    Dr. B

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